Artichoke Tea, herbal tea from Dalat ( 20 bags)

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Artichoke Tea, herbal tea from Dalat ( 20 bags)

4.00


Description

Artichoke (Cynara scolymus) is a large thistle-like plant that is native to the regions of southern Europe, North Africa, and the Canary Islands. The artichoke is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants. The ancient Egyptians placed great value on the plant - it is clearly seen in drawings involving fertility and sacrifice. Moreover, this plant was used by the ancient Greeks and Romans as a digestive aid. In sixteenth-century Europe, the artichoke was favored as a food by royalty. It is also used to lower cholesterol, as a digestive aid, for liver protection and gallstones.

Artichoke leaves contain a wide number of active constituents, including cynarin, 1,3 dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoylquinic acid, and scolymoside. The choleretic (bile stimulating) action of the plant has been well documented in a placebo-controlled trial involving 20 healthy volunteers. After the administration of 1.92 grams of standardized artichoke extract directly into the duodenum, liver bile flow increased by 127.3% and 151.5% at the 30- and 60-minute mark, respectively. This choleretic effect has led to the popular use of artichoke extract in Europe for the treatment of mild dyspepsia and indigestion-particularly following a meal high in fat. In an open-label study with 553 persons suffering from non-specific digestive disorders (including dyspepsia and indigestion), 320-640 mg of a standardized artichoke extract taken three times per day was found to reduce nausea, abdominal pain, constipation, and flatulence in over 70% of the study participants.

The plant has also been employed therapeutically in the treatment of elevated lipid levels, although with mixed results. For example, a research study in the late 1970s using cynarin at a daily amount of either 250 mg or 750 mg concluded that it did not alter cholesterol and triglyceride levels in patients with familial high cholesterol after three months of therapy. In contrast, however, a recent open-label European study (partially summarized above) suggests that artichoke is efficacious in altering lipid values. After using a standardized artichoke extract (320 mg/capsule) at an amount of one to two capsules two to three times a day for six weeks, total cholesterol and triglyceride values decreased significantly by an average of 11.5% and 12.5%, respectively. HDL-cholesterol levels did not rise significantly. The results of this study, however, must be questioned because of the lack of dietary control and the lack of a placebo group.

While scientists are not certain how artichoke leaves lower cholesterol, test tube studies have suggested that the action may be due to an inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and/or the increased elimination of cholesterol because of the plant's choleretic action. In test tube studies, the flavonoids from the artichoke (e.g., luteolin) have been shown to prevent LDL-cholesterol oxidation. Moreover, artichoke leaves may be liver protective, as test tube results have demonstrated its effectiveness against carbon tetrachloride-induced toxicity.

 

 

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